Category Archives: Quality Control

Parse an Online Table into an R Dataframe – Westgard’s Biological Variation Database

Background

From time to time I have wanted to bring an online table into an R dataframe. While in principle, the data can be cut and paste into Excel, sometimes the table is very large and sometimes the columns get goofed up in the process. Fortunately, there are a number of R tools for accomplishing this. I am just going to show one approach using the rvest package. The rvest package also makes it possible to interact with forms on webpages to request specific material which can then be scraped. I think you will see the potential if you look here.

In our (simple) case, we will apply this process to Westgard's desirable assay specifications as shown on his website. The goal is to parse out the biological variation tables, get them into a dataframe and the write to csv or xlsx.

Reading in the Data

The first thing to do is to load the rvest and httr packages and define an html session with the html_session() function.

Now looking at the webpage, you can see that there are 8 columns in the tables of interest. So, we will define an empty dataframe with 8 columns.

We need to know which part of the document to scrape. This is a little obscure, but following the instructions in this post, we can determine that the xpaths we need are:

/html/body/div[1]/div[3]/div/main/article/div/table[1]

/html/body/div[1]/div[3]/div/main/article/div/table[2]

/html/body/div[1]/div[3]/div/main/article/div/table[3]

etc.

There are 8 such tables in the whole webpage. We can define a character vector for these as such:

Now we make a loop to scrape the 8 tables and with each iteration of the loop, append the scraped subtable to the main dataframe called biotable using the rbind() function. We have to use the parameter fill = TRUE in the html_table() function because the table does not happen to always a uniform number of columns.

Clean Up

Now that we have the raw data out, we can have a quick look at it:

X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7 X8
Analyte Number of Papers Biological Variation Biological Variation Desirable specification Desirable specification Desirable specification
Analyte Number of Papers CVI CVg I(%) B(%) TE(%)
S- 11-Desoxycortisol 2 21.3 31.5 10.7 9.5 27.1
S- 17-Hydroxyprogesterone 2 19.6 50.4 9.8 13.5 29.7
U- 4-hydroxy-3-methoximandelate (VMA) 1 22.2 47.0 11.1 13.0 31.3
S- 5' Nucleotidase 2 23.2 19.9 11.6 7.6 26.8
U- 5'-Hydroxyindolacetate, concentration 1 20.3 33.2 10.2 9.7 26.5
S- α1-Acid Glycoprotein 3 11.3 24.9 5.7 6.8 16.2
S- α1-Antichymotrypsin 1 13.5 18.3 6.8 5.7 16.8
S- α1-Antitrypsin 3 5.9 16.3 3.0 4.3 9.2

We can see that we need define column names and we need to get rid of some rows containing extraneous column header information. There are actually 8 such sets of headers to remove.

Let's now find rows we don't want and remove them.

You will find that the table has missing data which is written as “- – -”. This should be now replaced by NA and the column names should be assigned to sequential integers. Also, we will remove all the minus signs after the specimen type. I'm not sure what they add.

Check it Out

Just having another look at the first 10 rows:

Sample Analyte NumPapers CVI CVG I B TE
S 11-Desoxycortisol 2 21.3 31.5 10.7 9.5 27.1
S 17-Hydroxyprogesterone 2 19.6 50.4 9.8 13.5 29.7
U 4-hydroxy-3-methoximandelate (VMA) 1 22.2 47.0 11.1 13.0 31.3
S 5' Nucleotidase 2 23.2 19.9 11.6 7.6 26.8
U 5'-Hydroxyindolacetate, concentration 1 20.3 33.2 10.2 9.7 26.5
S α1-Acid Glycoprotein 3 11.3 24.9 5.7 6.8 16.2
S α1-Antichymotrypsin 1 13.5 18.3 6.8 5.7 16.8
S α1-Antitrypsin 3 5.9 16.3 3.0 4.3 9.2
S α1-Globulins 2 11.4 22.6 5.7 6.3 15.7
U α1-Microglobulin, concentration, first morning 1 33.0 58.0 16.5 16.7 43.9

Now examining the structure:

It's kind-of undesirable to have numbers as characters so…

Write the Data

Using the xlsx package, you can output the table to an Excel file in the current working directory.

If you are having trouble getting xlsx to install, then just write as csv.

Conclusion

You can now use the same general approach to parse any table you have web access to, no mater how small or big it is. Here is a complete script in one place:

Parting Thought on Tables

You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.

(Psalm 23:5)

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Determine the CV of a Calculated Lab Reportable – Bioavailable Testosterone

Background

At the AACC meeting last week, some of my friends were bugging me that I had not made a blog post in 10 months. Without getting into it too much, let's just say I can blame Cerner. Thanks also to a prod from a friend, here is an approach to a fairly common problem.

We all report calculated quantities out of our laboratories–quantities such as LDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, aldosterone:renin ratio, free testosterone, eGFR etc. How does one determine the precision (i.e. imprecision) of a calculated quantity. While earlier in my life, I might go to the trouble of trying to do such calculations analytically using the rules of error propagation, in my later years, I am more pragmatic and I'm happy to use a computational approach.

In this example, we will model the precision in calculated bioavailable testosterone (CBAT). Without explanation, I provide an R function for CBAT (and free testosterone) where testosterone is reported in nmol/L, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is reported in nmol/L, and albumin is reported in g/L. Using the Vermeulen Equation as discussed in this publication, you can calculate CBAT as follows:

To sanity-check this, we can use this online calculator. Taking a typical male testosterone of 20 nmol/L, an SHBG of 50 nmol/L and an albumin of 43 g/L, we get the following:

which is confirmed by the online calculator. Because the function is vectorized, we an submit a vector of testosterone results and SHBG results and get a vector of CBAT results.

Precision of Components

We now need some precision data for the three components. However, in our lab, we just substitute 43 g/L for the albumin, so we will leave that term out of the analysis and limit our precision calculation to testosterone and SHBG. This will allow us to present the precision as surface plots as a function of total testosterone and SHBG.

We do testosterone by LC-MS/MS using Deborah French's method. In the last three months, the precision has been 3.9% at 0.78 nmol/L, 5.5% at 6.7 nmol/L, 5.2% at 18.0 nmol/L, and 6.0% at 28.2 nmol/L. We are using the Roche Cobas e601 SHBG method which, according to the package insert, has precision of 1.8% at 14.9 nmol/L, 2.1 % at 45.7 nmol/L, and 4.0% at 219 nmol/L.

plot of chunk unnamed-chunk-4

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Build Approximation Functions

We will want to generate linear interpolations of these precision profiles. Generally, we might watnt to use non-linear regression to do this but I will just linearly interpolate with the approxfun() function. This will allow us to just call a function to get the approximate CV at concentrations other than those for which we have data.

Now, if we want to know the precision of SHBG at, say, 100 nmol/L, we can just write,

to obtain our precision result.

Random Simulation

Now let's build a grid of SHBG and total testosterone (TT) values at which we will calculate the precision for CBAT.

At each point on the grid, we will have to generate, say, 100000 random TT values and 100000 random SHBG values with the appropriate precision and then calculate the expected precision of CBAT at those concentrations.

Let's do this for a single pair of concentrations by way of example modelling the random analytical error as Gaussian using the rnorm() function.

So, we can build the process of calculating the CV of CBAT into a function as follows:

Now, we can make a matrix of the data for presenting a plot, calculating the CV and appending it to the dataframe.

Now make plot using the wireframe() function.

plot of chunk unnamed-chunk-11

This shows us that the CV of CBAT ranges from about 4–8% over the TT and SHBG ranges we have looked at.

Conclusion

We have determined the CV of calculated bioavailable testosterone using random number simulations using empirical CV data and produced a surface plot of CV. This allows us to comment on the CV of this lab reportable as a function of the two variables by which it is determined.

Parting Thought on Monte Carlo Simulations

The die is cast into the lap, but its every decision is from the LORD.

(Prov 16:33)

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